Sensory Processing Disorder Social Stories





Social stories are individualized short stories that are highly affective for teaching children new skills. They teach children what is expected in social behaviors and different settings such as school, with friends, appointments or shopping. 

They are most commonly used for children with autism and other special needs such as difficulties with comprehension, developmental delays or those who struggle with social challenges, they can also be very beneficial to all children when explaining situations and changes. 




Social stories explain to children what changes may be happening in the future, how to do something new or could even explain a situation and how they could handle it appropriately. 
Social stories can be sometimes called different names such as social narratives, story-based interventions and social scripts too. 





Social stories were developed by child pediatrician Dr. Carol Gray in 1990. She would write social stories for the children with Autism that she worked with. 

Social stories can teach children different skills. Using social stories everyday with events and situations will help your child so they don't find different situations confusing while also cutting down on your child's anxiety. 

Parents can make their own social stories for their children and they can be purchased online. When your child has been reading a social story it's important to remind them about the story the new skills they've learned from the story. When the child is successful, it's very important to reward them with a lot of encouragement and praise. 




If you would like to use social stories you can always consult with your child's phycologist or therapists for direction. 

A social story should have details about the situation, what usually happens in the situation and what behaviors are expected in that situation. This will help your child with difficult and challenging behaviors , while learning new skills. 

Social stories can be downloaded to their iPad, printed for them for at home or while they are out, they can be purchased, parents or therapists can make them too. They can be created in past, present or future tense. They can be custom made for certain situations made just for your child. Most social stories use illustrations because it's easier for some children to learn visually using step by step photos. 


Example Social Story: 





Social Stories 


The New Social Story Book, Revised and Expanded 15th Anniversary Edition: Over 150 Social Stories that Teach Everyday Social Skills to Children and Adults with Autism and their Peers
Since the early ‘90s, Carol Gray’s world-famous Social Stories have helped thousands of children with autism spectrum disorders. This 15th Anniversary Edition of her best-selling book offers ready-to-use stories that parents and educators have depended on for years―with new sections added! Additions include how to most effectively use and apply the stories, how to improve the lives of younger children, and Social Stories for teens and adults with autism. Developed through years of experience, these strategically written stories explain social situations in ways children and adults with autism understand while teaching social skills needed to be successful at home, school, work, and in the community.

My Social Stories Book
Over the last decade, Carol Gray's Social Stories approach has become established as a highly effective way of teaching social and life skills to children on the autism spectrum. Taking the form of short narratives, the Stories in My Social Stories Book take children step by step through basic activities such as brushing your teeth, taking a bath and getting used to new clothes. It also helps children to understand different experiences such as going to school, shopping and visiting the doctor. These stories are written for preschoolers aged from two to six, and the book is a useful primer for all young children - but most especially those on the autism spectrum.

My Social Stories Book contains over 150 Stories, and is illustrated throughout with line drawings by Sean McAndrew, which form a visual counterpart to the text. A helpful introduction explains to parents and carers how to get the most out of the book.













DISCLAIMER: I am not an Occupational Therapist. I am a sensory parent. The information on this website is not medical advice and does not replace the information that your child's therapists gives you. These are just ideas and information that I have learned myself over the years of being a parent. If you are concerned for your child, please always seek medical attention through a family doctor, pediatrician or therapist. This website is for informational purposes only. Each child is different and what works for one child may not for another. Please always consult with a professional.